Pediatric Molecular Imaging Team

Principal Investigator

Heike Daldrup-Link

Heike Daldrup-Link, MD, PhD

Professor of Radiology and by courtesy, of Pediatrics
Director, Pediatric Molecular Imaging, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford
Co-Director, Cancer Imaging & Early Detection Program, Stanford Cancer Institute

As a physician-scientist being involved in the clinical care of pediatric patients and developing novel imaging technologies in a basic science lab, my goal is to link the fields of Nanomedicine, Cell Biology and Medical Imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team successfully translated numerous nanomedicine technologies from preclinical research concepts to clinical applications, thereby creating direct value for our patients.

Email » | Phone: (650) 723-8996 | Stanford Profile

Lab Members

Mairead Barroso

Mairead Barroso, MA

Administrative Associate

As an administrative assistant and research administrator I work with the Daldrup-Link Lab to facilitate grant proposals and management. I also coordinate with Dr. Daldrup-Link and her lab members to manage ongoing and upcoming studies ensuring that they are compliant with university and sponsor policies.

| Phone: (650) 725-2548

Laura J. Pisani

Laura J. Pisani, PhD

MR Physicist
Member, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)
Stanford University School of Medicine


As an MRI Physicist, I support the Daldrup-Link lab in development of non-invasive MRI techniques and clinical data analysis for in vivo diagnosis of immune responses to solid organ transplants. I provide monthly Introductory MRI seminars; hands-on training for MRI, micro-PET, fluorescence imaging; and help optimize experimental design and image data analysis.

| Phone: (650) 498-7865 | Stanford Profile

Kristina Hawk

K. Elizabeth Hawk, MD, PhD

Instructor

I am an instructor in the Department of Radiology and am interested in the development of new and advanced imaging technologies for children with cancer. As a physician scientist, integrated MD/PhD training helped me to build a foundation to explore translational research efforts, using a full and intricate understanding of the research process, and the developed ability to understand, discuss and teach new emerging concepts.

Ashok Joseph Theruvath

Ashok Joseph Theruvath, MD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

I am interested in the development of new and clinically applicable MR and PET/MR imaging technologies for in vivo tracking of stem cell transplants. My long-term goal is to pursue an academic career as a physician scientist that allows me to make a significant impact on the clinical translation of novel molecular imaging techniques, which will advance our clinical knowledge and improve treatment outcomes.

Wei Wu

Wei Wu, PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

I am interested in linking the fields of cell biology and imaging sciences to advance our understanding of human health and disease. I want to explore and uncover fundamental mechanisms that affect the physiology and function of specific cell populations in living organisms.

Louise Kiru

Louise Kiru, PhD

Research Instructor

I am developing imaging methods to track therapeutic cells, including stem cells and T-cells, in small and large animal models, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), radioluminescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI). I am specifically interested in studying gender disparities that might lead to differences in tumor biology and therapy responses.

Jan-Ran Wang

Jan-Ran (Joyce) Wang, PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

I am a computer scientist with extensive experience in biomedical image processing, computer and video segmentation and neural network design. I am interested in developing and testing new artificial intelligence algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of cancer in children.

Ali Rashidi, MD

Ali Rashidi, MD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

I am interested in musculoskeletal imaging. One major concern for successful outcomes of stem cell therapies is the cell fate after implantation. My ultimate goal for stem cell research is to develop clinically applicable, non-invasive and repeatable imaging approaches which can be used for long-term tracking of transplanted stem cells. I also work on development and testing of nanoparticles for clinical imaging of bone metastases with MRI and PET.

Lucia Barratto, MD

Lucia Barratto, MD

Research Scientist

I am interested in novel clinical imaging technologies for cancer staging and re-staging, such as whole body diffusion weighted MRI and PET/MR imaging, in conjunction with applications of iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents. My current projects involve comparisons of different whole body imaging techniques for therapy monitoring in pediatric patients with malignant tumors and investigations of chemotherapy-induced tissue injuries in pediatric cancer survivors.

Michael Zhang, MD

Michael Zhang, MD

Postdoctoral Medical Fellow

I am a neurosurgery resident at Stanford and am currently completing a research fellowship, supported by the Stanford Cancer Imaging T32 Training Program (SCIT). My ongoing research uses radiomics and molecular imaging techniques to enrich care in neuro-oncology. Clinically, I am particularly interested in the spectrum of brain tumor management, with particular attention to radiosurgery, immunotherapies, and metastasis.

Elena Violari, MD

Elena Violari, MD

Fellow

Intravascular catheters are important for the care of many pediatric patients, such as patients undergoing dialysis and patients with cancer, among many others. Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are a major problem for successful recovery of patients in a hospital setting. CLABSI occurs due to an infection at the skin entrance site and subsequent migration of that infection along the extraluminal catheter surface to the bloodstream. I am testing a novel device, which applies cold plasma to sterilize the skin surface and extracorporal part of the indwelling catheter. Physically, cold plasma consists of free electrons and radicals, ions and excited molecules, which can form temporary micropores in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, which allows for entrance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) such as nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which in turn react with the free DNA in bacteria and kill these by inducing DNA oxidation and double-strand breaks.

Fadi El Rami, PhD

Fadi El Rami, PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

I am a molecular biologist, immunologist and microbiologist with multi-disciplinary training to address complex biological questions using an array of biochemical, genetic, and molecular biology techniques including high throughput transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic approaches. My current project involves genetic engineering of CAR T-cells for in vivo tracking with PET and integrated PET/MRI technologies.

Elton (Ben) Greene, MD

Elton (Ben) Greene, MD

Fellow

I am a clinical fellow in the Pediatric Radiology Division at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. I am particularly interested in Pediatric Cancer Imaging and Musculoskeletal Imaging. Currently, I am participating in a research project which compares the value of different advanced imaging techniques for the diagnosis of bone metastases in children with cancer.

Edwin Chang, PhD

Edwin Chang, PhD

Research Associate

I previously worked at Geron Corporation (Menlo Park, California) where I studied the mechanism of cellular immortalization and cellular aging with the goal to develop new therapies against cancer. I joined Stanford University in 2002 and the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) in 2009, where I explored the applicability of various modalities (PET, BLI, CT, MRI, US) for many projects related to cancer under the leadership of Sanjiv Sam Gambhir. Most recently, I joined the Daldrup-Link lab where I continue to investigate new cell therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma with multi-modality imaging techniques.

Diana Lopez Garcia, MD

Diana Lopez Garcia, MD

Fellow

I am a clinical fellow in the pediatric radiology division and am working on a research project on the impact of chemotherapy on the metabolism of the brain in pediatric cancer survivors. Our team is particularly interested in finding imaging biomarkers that can predict the impact of methotrexate therapy on long-term neurocognitive outcomes.

Famyrah Lafortune

Famyrah Lafortune

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate studying human biology and international relations at Stanford. I am interested in learning the process of cell labeling via cell volume exchange for convective transfer (VECT). Stanford is one of the leading centres in the field of Molecular Imaging. I am excited to learn about novel technologies for immunotherapy and in vivo tracking of therapeutic T-cells to osteosarcomas.

Nour Mary Aissaoui

Nour Mary Aissaoui

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate studying human biology at Stanford. I am interested in tracking stem cells in vivo with MRI and PET imaging and learning about stem cell mediated cartilage regeneration for the treatment of traumatic cartilage injuries, osteochondrosis dissecans and degenerative arthritis.

Jordi Garcia-Diaz

Jordi Garcia-Diaz

Visiting Medical Student

I am a visiting Medical Student from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and I am interested in the efficacy of different imaging modalities (PET/MR, Diffusion Weighted Imaging, and PET/CT) in staging pediatric cancer patients. I am also interested in applying artificial intelligence to imaging data to help improve image quality and patient radiation dose.

Ramyashree Nyalakonda

Ramyashree Nyalakonda

Visiting Student

I am a visiting undergraduate student from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and am interested in new integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) technologies for cancer imaging in children. I am also interested in understanding advantages and limitations of diffusion-weighted MRI and integrated PET/MRI for pediatric cancer staging and treatment monitoring.

Tina Ho

Tina Ho

Visiting Student

I am a software engineer and visiting student in the Daldrup-Link lab. I plan to pursue a medical degree in the near future and am exploring ways that I can utilize my tech skills to bridge the tech gap in the healthcare field. I am interested in learning more about the cross-section of medicine and machine learning — especially in the context of medical imaging to help diagnose patients.

Elizabeth Santosh

Elizabeth Santosh

Visiting Student

I am a visiting high school student from the Claremont High School in southern California. My goal is to become a medical doctor. I am interested in learning about new imaging techniques that have an impact on pediatric patients. Therefore, I want to learn more about imaging methods such as integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) technologies for pediatric cancer imaging.

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